McDonald’s employees demands for higher wages irrational

McDonald’s employees protesting to receive higher wages presents a real dilemma.
On the one hand, minimum wages are not what most would consider a living wage. On the other hand, most believe that minimal skills for minimum work deserves minimum pay.
While I agree that the minimum wage is insufficient to support a normal American family, I don’t believe McDonald’s employees should be paid near the amounts that they’re seeking.
Why shouldn’t these fast food employees be paid $15 or more? The answer is simple: They don’t deserve it.
They do deserve a competitive and fair wage (probably above minimum), but they do not need to be paid as much or more than those in more dangerous or difficult jobs. I can’t think of any reason why someone who makes fast food should be paid more than an armed security officer or a low-mid level supervisor in retail or even some construction or traffic workers.
Although I don’t believe the protests for wages over $15-per-hour are at all rational, I am happy to hear about Walmart’s wage hike and I hope it’s a view of what is to come for U.S. workers. Those who work hard and do well for a corporation should be allowed to earn a living wage over time — especially if the company is doing well financially (which McDonald’s isn’t).
If a worker wants a higher wage, they need to do what most of us had to do to earn those higher wages.
If you work at McDonald’s and it doesn’t pay enough, take your food service experience to another establishment. Fight your way to the top! The American dream of prosperity can only be achieved through effort and by distinguishing yourself from the competition.
Entry-level jobs at McDonald’s weren’t meant to be lifelong goals but perhaps just a part of your journey toward a long-term career.
In the end, we have a capitalist system for a reason. Those who work harder will end up in better positions making more money. Companies that don’t compete for good workers will fail, and companies that pay well will thrive.