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Australian indie rapper releases soft grunge mixtape

The indie rap scene is as eclectic as it is crowded. You might stumble upon witty ephemera like what Childish Gambino spits, or you could be completely frightened by the ample shouting of Death Grips. But, to say that rap hasn’t changed since its embryotic youth is a myth.

Take a listen to indie rap newcomer Allday. With the release of his latest mixtape “Soft Grunge Love Rap,” the Aussie mixes laid back hip-hop vibes with underground aesthetics often associated with rappers like Yung Lean.

At first, the mixtape strikes you as something the amateur rapper from your hometown might whip up in his bedroom. With radio-like interludes of Allday announcing his own mixtape, it’s easy to dismiss this as a wannabe L’homme Run (Ezra Koenig’s original rap project), but as you begin to digest the mixtape, it steps into more existential ponderings and well-produced mixes. The track “Angels” even has samplings of a priestly phone interview about guardian angels and their purpose in our lives.

It’s easy to tell Allday comes from a South Australian suburb. As seen in most rap subgenres, many of his themes revolve around growing up with the same childhood friends most of his life and objectifying women. Despite this, he still finds a way to be likeable and original in his rhymes.

Allday’s chill beats and laid-back style have a charming nuance. You could even argue that with his goofy internet-esque persona, he is like the indie rap version of Mac Demarco. All comparisons aside, though, Allday enters an overcrowded arena of bedroom-studio artists trying to make it big. He’ll have to bring something very raw and powerful in his next release to truly step out as a frontrunner.

You can stream “Soft Grunge Love Rap” via US label Wind-Up Records on SoundCloud.

 

 

About The Author

Luke Janke

Luke Janke is a super senior studying journalism at FGCU. When he’s not listening to podcasts, he’s busy producing his own podcast, Full Pulp. Concerts and music are at the forefront of his horizon, and when there’s an ounce of free time you’ll find him in his home studio laying down tracks for his music project, Bull Moose Party. As a self-proclaimed nihilist, his affinity for death is emphasized by the authentic squirrel skull found on his desk in the newsroom.

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