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Movie Review: ‘The World’s End’ hilariously creative

“The World’s End” makes for a trilogy of films from a seemingly holy trinity. Nick Frost, Simon Pegg, and Edgar Wright certainly don’t seem to have much trouble generating laughs. Their previous films, “Shaun of the Dead” and “Hot Fuzz,” aren’t lacking fans, and hype has run rampant for their third entry. If it disappoints, it’s only slightly. It’s still an incredibly funny film and a creative one at that.

As the trailer tells us, five boys once sought to complete the legendary Golden Mile. Twelve pubs, twelve pints and, presumably, as many hours in bed the next day. They never made it and, twenty years later, one manages to rope all the others into giving it one last shot. The trailer also reveals a fair amount of the insanity that ensues. This is a case where it may be best to avoid the trailer and go in as fresh as possible.

“The World’s End” is riffing on somewhat more niche material this time around. It’s not something that holds the film back, but familiarity with the genre conventions being lampooned does bring another level of enjoyment. Wright and Pegg are as sharp and detailed as ever. Dialogue’s certainly not lacking wit and all of the interactions do a wonderful job of building each of the characters. Jokes are delivered one after the other or even hidden for those few people who are really paying attention.

This movie, like its predecessors, invites repeat viewings. Simon Pegg, Nick Frost, Martin Freeman, Paddy Considine, and Eddie Marsan (Gary, Andy, Oliver, Steven and Eddie, respectively) are hilarious as the core group of friends. Rosamund Pike adds to the dynamic, being Oliver’s sister, Gary’s former flame, and Steven’s love interest. They play off of each other incredibly well and the film is at its best when they’re together. Pegg and Frost in particular do a great job playing characters that are very different from their past roles.

Truth be told, there’s not much negative to say about “The World’s End.” Perhaps it’s not as funny or quotable as “Shaun of the Dead” or “Hot Fuzz.” It probably could have ended just slightly earlier. It may at times be too dry or too goofy for some. When looking at the final product, it all feels a bit like nit picking. In the end, it serves its audience well.

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