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What are you doing for Valentine’s Day?

Flowers, chocolates in heart shaped boxes, stuffed teddy bears and dinners out: All of these things have become synonymous with Feb. 14, a day we also recognize as Valentine’s Day.

Valentine’s originated from “The Legend of St. Valentine,” where some stories suggest that the emperor Valentine may have been killed for attempting to help Christians escape harsh Roman prisons; it is believed that he sent the first Valentine to a young girl who was possibly the jailor’s daughter. Despite a brutal history and much over-consumerism (it is reported that consumers will spend $17.3 billion dollars on the holiday this year alone), many FGCU students argue that the main purpose of Valentine’s Day is to show those that you care about how much you love them.

“Even if I did not have a boyfriend, I would still do things for my friends and family to show them that I love them. Valentine’s Day is a day where people should send something to those that they love to show that they appreciate them,” said Alex Conroy, a senior computer information systems major.

According to Conroy, she and her boyfriend will be changing things up a bit and will be doing something a little untraditional on Valentine’s Day.

“On Valentine’s Day, my boyfriend and I are going to a bar in Mississippi, and we plan on going out to dinner the next night as it will be less busy,” Conroy said.

Also changing up the tradition of Valentine’s Day is senior criminal justice major Nayi Oliveros, who will be spending the day with her friend and her boyfriend who is under special circumstances.

“I will probably spend Valentine’s Day with my friend and boyfriend. More with my friend than with my boyfriend, because he is in Active Duty. We will get to FaceTime though,” Oliveros said. “It means to me an extra day to show some love.”

Oliveros also argued that people shouldn’t be so expectant of receiving materialistic items from significant others, but should rather make Valentine’s Day about having quality time with those they love.

“I think some people expect gifts from their significant others; instead they should expect more quality time with those that they love,” Oliveros said.

Alex Valean, a junior political science major, believes that people can take or leave Valentine’s Day, no matter what their relationship status may be.

“Valentine’s Day gives you an opportunity to sort of express your affection to your significant other more than you usually do,” said Valean. “It is more of a couple’s holiday. Personally for me when I was single I didn’t do anything, so those who are single can let it be irrelevant. Either it is important to you or it’s not. You can either just let it pass or use it as a circumstance to find somebody,” he said.

Agreeing with Valean is junior history major Nicholas Queen, who states that the day often termed as “V-Day” shouldn’t be taken too seriously.

“It is just an excuse to go out and treat yourself and the person you’re with. Even if you are single, still go out anyways. You will still have fun and you will get to meet new people,” Queen said. “I do not think you should take it too seriously; it is really a fake holiday, but make the most of it and have fun.”

Kenzi Polotto, a junior legal studies major, argues that the purpose of Valentine’s Day should be celebrated every day.

“I will be spending Valentine’s Day with my boyfriend. I do not know what we are doing yet; he is surprising me. I am guessing dinner out and the beach,” said Polotto. “At least for me, even though I feel like it should be shown every day, I feel that that day is a specific day to express your love for those around you. I know some people view it (Valentine’s Day) in a cynical way, but for me I feel like it is a day to remind those you love of how much you love them.”

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