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Articles on the Internet aren’t always the truth

How often do you read fake news articles?

I will admit that I unknowingly read at least five fake news articles on my social media newsfeeds just this week.  There are so many faux news websites that misguided people accept as fact while skimming news on the Internet.

Most people aren’t using investigative techniques to filter through all the satire that appears on the web.

Times are tough; Facebook and Twitter feeds can be too overwhelming with statuses and page updates to really pay close attention to the important point of reading news.

There are at least 16 fake news websites that I know of, filtered throughout real news sites on the Internet.

The Onion can be a great website filled with laughs and satire — or terrible if you don’t realize none of it is actually true. The Onion is an entertainment website know for its outrageous satirical news articles, that has become the successor of the crummy tabloid magazines you see at grocery check out lines.

These articles, however, are just as well written as real journalism.  These articles employ real journalism techniques, so much to the point that they don’t give the common reader the idea that it is a fake story.

These articles can be extremely entertaining, and I admit, they serve a great purpose for people who love to read and love to laugh at a well-written faux news article.

My only advice is to read more like Batman.

When I say, “read like Batman,” I mean be more of a skeptic when reading anything and everything on the Internet. Search for the truth. To start reading more fact than fiction. Back up your story search on more credible news sites such as BBC News, NPR or thecNew York Times.

The filter is a device people should keep in mind; truth and reality is a flimsy thing once you hit enter on Google search.

 

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