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Unique social media site a breeding ground for hipsters

You walk into a new restaurant located downtown that you’ve been hearing your co-workers rave about all week.

“It’s so unique and trendy down there,” they would say.

You hold the door open for your girlfriend who, up until this moment, has never mentioned vintage photography to you or shown any interest in flower crowns.

As you set foot into this restaurant you notice all the chandeliers are fitted with bulbs emitting their glow through Mason jars; the walls are decorated with repurposed wood that was probably salvaged from a local dump, and the tables are shipping pallets raised up by pulleys attached to the ceiling.

Suddenly, you turn to your girlfriend and she’s sporting a crown of tulips on her flaxen hair and around her neck hangs a vintage Polaroid 320 from 1969, and your waiter asks you if you’d like to try a quinoa-infused cocktail, which is served in a hollowed out acorn.

This is when you realize that Pinterest has entered your veins.

It seems that people everywhere are taking mundane activities in life and making them “pinteresting,” or what I like to call post-modern hipster.

It’s all you see on Facebook anymore: friends getting married in abandoned barns, business meetings around campfires while an Amish violinist plays his rendition of “Mad World,” and even children being born in a DIY backyard salmon hatchery. Pinterest has infiltrated our lives.

What was once seen as hip, original, vintage and trendy has become the mainstream. Ten years ago, if you showed your friends an arm-knitted scarf that took you 30 minutes to put together, they may have been impressed. But thanks to crafty social media such as Pinterest, everyone and their mother knows how to armknit.

Photographs are no longer acceptable in HD. Old vintage cameras have that “grainy feel” that “you just don’t get these days.” It’s like vintage photography is an old girlfriend we can’t get over and may or may not have built a shrine in her memory (Sherry, please come back!).

We assume that if we show up to a music festival with moccasins and an alpaca-knit sweater we will stick out of the mainstream and be cool while nonchalantly pretending that we didn’t try really, really hard to look cool. Post-modern hipsterism praises irony and bad folk music (I’m looking at you, The Lumineers).

And if you’re looking for the friend in your inner circle that owns a record player, trust me they’ll tell you all about their extensive Goodwill record collection.

I’m always supporting the arts and being creative and different, but social craft platforms such as Pinterest have turned everyone into what resembles a large modern art museum.

About The Author

Luke Janke

Luke Janke is a super senior studying journalism at FGCU. When he’s not listening to podcasts, he’s busy producing his own podcast, Full Pulp. Concerts and music are at the forefront of his horizon, and when there’s an ounce of free time you’ll find him in his home studio laying down tracks for his music project, Bull Moose Party. As a self-proclaimed nihilist, his affinity for death is emphasized by the authentic squirrel skull found on his desk in the newsroom.

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