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Centuries of fighting for equality lead to this

The day after Donald Trump’s presidential inauguration, more than three million people around the world took to the streets to show their opposition.

It is estimated that in Washington, D.C. alone, more than 500,000 people attended the rallies, which was three times more than the amount of people who attended the inauguration.

More than one million rail trips were taken on the Metro, which is the second highest in history, next to Barack Obama’s second inauguration.

People from all walks of life attended the marches. The crowds of protesters included veterans, celebrities, college students, children, scientists and more.

Each person that attended the Women’s March on Washington, or any march for that matter, came for a reason and came with a passion for change.

Some came in place of relatives; some came to be a part of something bigger than themselves, and some came to fight back

Protestors donned signs with phrases like “Grab America Back,” “Nasty Women Keep Fighting” and “Love Not Hate Keeps America Great.”

Trump denied the reports that more people attended the Women’s March on Washington than attended his inauguration, and on Sunday, Jan. 22 he tweeted, “Watched protests yesterday but was under the impression that we just had an election! Why didn’t these people vote? Celebs hurt cause badly.”

Two hours later, he responded more cordially by tweeting, “Peaceful protests are a hallmark of our democracy. Even if I don’t always agree, I recognize the rights of people to express their views.”

However, some of the protests did escalate, such as the one that took place in Franklin Square where marchers smashed the windows of both a Starbucks and a limo outside the cafe. No arrests were made in Washington, D.C. as a direct result of the marches, according to a capital official.

Division in our country is only growing as these protests occur and as the media continues to elevate the situation. While I do think everybody’s voices need to be heard, at this point we must come together as a country and make compromises, rather than each party further polarizing its followers even more.

If Trump refused to make changes to his platform in the year and a half since he announced his candidacy, it seems unlikely that he would be willing to make those changes now.

To me, the Women’s March stood for everything feminism and gender equality has accomplished in the past two hundred years.

It stood for our voting rights, equal pay and our ability to access reproductive health care.

This march was incredibly important in reigniting the feminist movement.

Unfortunately, I do not think that Trump and the Republican party will take these marches seriously, despite the fact that one in a hundred Americans attended a march.

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