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Make loving others a year-long practice

Make loving others a  year-long practice

The history of Valentines Day begins

without a Hallmark or the music of
Luther Vandross. The roots of this overly
commercialized holiday begins in ancient
Rome with a festival called Lupercalia.
The purpose of Lupercalia was to
secure fertility and keep out evil. Two male
youths, clad in animal skin, ran around the
city slapping passersby with strips of goat
skin. This tradition was observed until the
end of the fifth century.
By the 18th
century, gift giving and  exchanging handmade
cards on Valentine’s Day had become common
in England. Handmade Valentine cards made
of lace and ribbons, and featuring cupids and
hearts, eventually spread to the American colonies.
The tradition of Valentine’s Day cards did
not become widespread in the United States,
however, until the 1850s.
But how many Americans today would
love for that holiday to stay in England, away
from the States? The number might shock
the cynics, but 60 percent of Americans
will celebrate Valentine’s Day. That only
puts them ahead of one holiday, and that,
shockingly, is St. Patrick’s Day.
But Americans being the consumers
that they are will shell out an average
of $130.97 on Valentine’s Day in 2013, up
from $126.03 last year, for a grand total of
spending by all consumers of $18.6 billion.
Despite these shocking statistics,
economics and management student
Christian Haman found joy in the holiday
and put it in perspective for Eagle News
readers:
“I just enjoy the spirit of the holiday.
I enjoy all holidays where people eat and
express love towards one another. There’s
something wrong if you feel bad with it, of
course, but that’s not the holiday’s fault,”
Haman said.
But why should this tradition be
reserved just for a cold day in the middle of
February?
Surely love, affection toward others, and
chocolate in moderation is something almost
everyone pines for while chasing the American
dream that includes a successful career,
security and a beautiful family.
One thing that is
certain is the positive aspects of Valentine’s
Day are seen in almost every other holiday in
America and should be expressed every day of
the year and not just reserved for one.
Maybe Valentine’s Day should take a
back seat with Hallmark. There are plenty
of planets in our solar system we could
launch them to while America learns that
love and friendship should be a year-round
celebration.

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