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‘Til death log us out

(EN Illustration / Emily Ford)

(EN Illustration / Emily Ford)

Read: Facebook now lets you post when you’re dead

Have you ever wondered what happens to your Facebook page after you’re six feet in the ground? Do you spend countless hours in a sleepless clammy bundle of anxiety in your bed at night willing your thoughts to how your profile will be managed after you’ve given up the ghost?

Do you frequent graveyards?

If so, you might want to check out Facebook’s new feature that allows you to post beyond the grave.

Facebook’s legacy post system was introduced last week as the optimal way to clean up your profile post-mortem.

How it works is simple, and not as creepy as it sounds: You choose someone you trust (probably not your college drinking buddy), Facebook sends them a message saying you’ve chosen them as the sole heir to your page, and if they accept they have access to your page after you get trampled by a bull moose.

Now, your legacy contact can’t actually edit posts or personal messages, but they can edit your “about” section and inform people that you have been deceased.

If you really want to stay social in the afterlife, have your legacy contact post a Ouija board on your timeline with the caption ‘Hit Me Up’.

This has been a long time coming for Facebook. Being one of the largest social media powers in the world, so many people use it that there’re bound to be a lot of dead people profiles. Who’s going to manage your cat memes or your Taylor Swift lyric posts when you’re gone?

As for me, I’ve already set up a legacy contact. I think it’s a step in the right direction for letting computers take over not only our lives, but our deaths as well. Fear not, though. Considering we give the responsibility to what I assume are humans, I don’t think we’ve completely given way to our robotic oppressors.

About The Author

Luke Janke

Luke Janke is a super senior studying journalism at FGCU. When he’s not listening to podcasts, he’s busy producing his own podcast, Full Pulp. Concerts and music are at the forefront of his horizon, and when there’s an ounce of free time you’ll find him in his home studio laying down tracks for his music project, Bull Moose Party. As a self-proclaimed nihilist, his affinity for death is emphasized by the authentic squirrel skull found on his desk in the newsroom.

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