Amendment 4 passes and restores ex-felon voting rights

In+this%2C+Monday%2C+Oct.+22%2C+2018+photo%2C+Jessica+Jones%2C+center%2C+speaks+to+people+gathered+around+the+Ben+%26amp%3B+Jerry%27s+%22Yes+on+4%22+Truck+about+Amendment+4+at+Charles+Hadley+Park+in+Miami.+Amendment+4%2C+asks+voters+to+restore+the+voting+rights+of+people+with+past+felony+convictions.+More+than+1.5+million+adults+in+Florida+are+ineligible+to+vote+because+they+have+felony+convictions.++%28AP+Photo%2FWilfredo+Lee%29

In this, Monday, Oct. 22, 2018 photo, Jessica Jones, center, speaks to people gathered around the Ben & Jerry’s “Yes on 4” Truck about Amendment 4 at Charles Hadley Park in Miami. Amendment 4, asks voters to restore the voting rights of people with past felony convictions. More than 1.5 million adults in Florida are ineligible to vote because they have felony convictions. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

By Bruno Halpern
Entertainment & Lifestyle Editor
This amendment excludes those convicted of murder and sexual offenses. Currently, former felons must wait at least 5 years after completing their sentences to ask the Florida Clemency Board to restore their rights.
According to Samuel Sinyangwe, a data scientist and policy analyst, this Amendment gives voting rights back to 40 percent of all black men in the state of Florida. In total, over 1 million ex-felons can vote in the next election.