Mexico’s Revolution Day is here

Mexico’s Revolution Day is a national public holiday that celebrates a 10-year revolution that began in 1910 to end the struggle against dictator Jose de la Cruz Porfirio Diaz Mori.
“I believe the holiday is confused very much for the Cinco de Mayo and many Mexicans and others are not educated well enough to know the difference,” said Jesika Torres, a freshman with Mexican ancestry.
General Diaz Mori was in power for 34 years from 1876 to 1911. This period came to be known as Porfiriato. Under Diaz Mori’s rule, Mexico had vast political stability and economic growth. However, the advancement came at a high cost for the low class, and the prosperity never filtered to it. Eventually, in 1910, the inequality among the classes was so evident that it angered people, so a revolutionary movement was started. Francisco Madero and Pancho Villa were among several key revolutionaries.
Nicolas Paloma, a senior with Mexican ancestry, said he doesn’t think the holiday is not very impactful.
“To be honest, it’s not that big of a holiday,” Paloma said. “It’s just more like a no work day in federal and government jobs.”
The holiday commemorates one of the most significant political and social occurrences in the 21st century. It is celebrated on the third Monday in November, near the official day on Nov. 20. A change in Mexico’s labor law in 2005 instituted that the public holiday would be celebrated every Monday instead of whatever day of the week Nov. 20 was every year.
Revolution Day is celebrated with outdoor events such as bazaars, festivals and parades in several Mexican cities. The Mexican flag is flown and many celebrate by shouting “Viva Mexico!” and “Viva la Revolucion!”
“My family personally doesn’t celebrate it, but we do acknowledge when it is and take pride in being Mexican,” Torres said.
To read this story in Spanish, click here