‘Fuller House’ feels like a forced walk down memory lane

It would be crazy to think that “Fuller House” would be better or even as good as its predecessor, “Full House.” But, going in with this mindset made it easier to recognize that the show was just … ok. Yes, the show was cute and had its funny moments; unfortunately, it didn’t even feel like the same series.
The original show was made up of three lovable men, who joined together to take care of some kids. Powered behind Bob Saget, Dave Coulier and the well-preserved John Stamos, “Full House” became a huge hit and was a household name from 1987 to 1995.
So, when it was announced, back in April of 2015, that “Fuller House” was coming, most fans probably took it as an exciting trip down memory lane, thinking that it was going to be great. But, the day has come, and I am glad I had such low expectations because I am disappointed. “Fuller House” doesn’t quite make it. Sadly, the nostalgia feels forced, and the jokes are bland.
The show is built around an all grown up D.J. Tanner (played by Candace Cameron Bure), who is a veterinarian, a new widow and a mom of three boys, a teen (played by Michael Campion), a preteen (played by Elias Harger) and a baby (played by twins Dashiell and Fox Messitt). Switching from the men-helping raise three girls, “Fuller House” focuses on three women helping to raise three boys. D.J. gets help from her famous sister, Stephanie (played by Jodie Sweetin) and her old best friend/neighbor Kimmy Gibbler (played by Andrea Barber) who is now an event planner and a single mother to her daughter (played by Soni Bringas).
“Fuller House” is a nice story about women coming together to get through a rough time in their lives, a thoughtful idea; but in this situation, the execution was terribly thoughtless. The spirited performances were only subpar, and the main reason why D.J. decides to move home was barely explored, leaving the viewer confused and wanting more information.
The comedy was easy and predictable. From irresponsible babysitting, farts and icky diapers, there was nothing new here. The show had a couple of cameos that I don’t quite understand. Such as, Maksim and Valentin Chmerkovskiy from “Dancing With the Stars,” playing Casanova stereotypes. Also present was a lifeless Macy Gray who at one point states, “What am I doing here? I won a Grammy!” Leaving me to wonder the same thing.
It’s also worth noting that “Full House” headliners Saget, Stamos, Coulier and Lori Loughlin are barely there. Their story has them shipped off somewhere else living a life post-parenthood. Their appearances are stingily parceled across episodes — some famous Elvis-crooning Stamos here, a little Coulier Bullwinkle impressions there and a dash of Saget sharing his cleaning tips and tricks.
The pilot has the whole crew back together while also showing some old shots from the original “Full House” series. Michelle (played by Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen) didn’t make it back at all for the show. But, that didn’t mean the show wasn’t going to mention her. Throughout the series, the cast took jabs at the twins for their absence. A noticeable one was in the first episode where Saget explains that Michelle is pursuing a fashion career, and then the cast gives side eye to the camera, drawing approving hollers from the crowd.
In the end, I am glad that I came in with low expectations because I am not as disappointed as I could be. There’s a plot, but it is not present in every episode, and the series tried too hard on the nostalgia factor.
Hearing Stephanie say “How rude!” was actually quite painful this time around. It’s unfortunate because there was promise here. A show that is loved by most is a guaranteed hit, so I don’t doubt that it will be renewed for a second season. Let’s hope it gets better.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXuGLswn2l0