Black lives matter: Activist group has drifted far away from its original purpose

In an attempt to convey both hurt feelings toward societal prejudice and outrage against lack of coverage in the media, Black Lives Matter protesters are once again disrupting presidential candidates and their rallies.
During a rally for Hillary Clinton’s campaign earlier this week, Black Lives Matter disrupted her speech while she was rolling out her plan for criminal justice reform. At the beginning of the rally, about 10 protesters from the group made their way to the front and began chanting, “Black Lives Matter” for almost the entire length of Clinton’s speaking time.
This follows a similar incident that occurred in Seattle in August, during a progressive rally held by U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders where activists forcefully took the stage. This comes as a surprise, considering Sanders’ support for the Black Lives Matter movement, and even putting it as a priority before “all lives matter” in the first Democratic debate.

In my opinion, the levels of irony layered in this protest are excruciatingly palatable. Clinton’s rally was held at historically black Clark Atlanta University, where she was for her “African Americans for Hillary” campaign.
She was introduced by NBA star Grant Hill, Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed and civil rights icon,Congressman John Lewis. The fact that Clinton was backed not only by hundreds of black students and legends raises into question the credibility of these Black Lives Matter protests.
Targeting those running for office who appear to be more for equality in the U.S. than most other candidates

is what frames Black Lives Matter as a belligerent sham, only driven by the manic need to be noticed without seeking the real enemies of their stance. We don’t see protests at Republican rallies where the question of “do black lives matter?” is hardly raised. In a rally earlier this year, Donald Trump held a rally where members of the KKK showed up in support. Where was Black Lives Matter then?

The leadership and direction of Black Lives Matter is nothing short of questionable. Time and time again, the organization has proven itself to be chaotic and brambly in its decisions to point fingers; their bull-in-a-china-shop methods have caused many supporters to lash out against leaders of the group through social media.
Marissa Johnson, co- founder of Black Lives Matter in Seattle, told MSNBC that young protesters are becoming more and more radicalized, and nobody engaged in the content of what she said during the disruption at Sanders’ rally. She and Marcia Chatelain, a history professor at Georgetown University, both share views regarding police brutality and how it affects black populations.
Chatelain shared her perspective on why activism is important with Dissent magazine in December of last year.

“As a black woman in America, this movement is fundamentally about my life and the lives of those I love,” Chatelain said. “I’ve participated in student-led actions — like die-ins and social media campaigns — and I consider myself a student of all these amazing activists. I am a beloved observer and a participant to the extent that I incorporate the movement in my teaching and encourage my students to get involved.”
Although Black Lives Matter plays an important role in today’s political climate, the leadership is askew and the message is far from on point.
With more protests toward anti- progressive Republican candidates or any other racist and brutal entity, the group may be able to gain its graces back with society, but its lashing out has caused nothing but embarrassment for Black Lives Matter.